Tagged / CQR

New paper by Dr. Caroline Ellis-Hill

Congratulations to Dr. Caroline Ellis-Hill on the publication of her article ‘We are not the same people we used to be: An exploration of family biographical narratives and identity change following traumatic brain injury’.  This paper was accepted for publication in 2017 and will now be finally published in its final format in the September issue of Neuropsychological Rehabilitation.

This scientific paper focuses recovery and rehabilitation following traumatic brain injury. Accumulation of subjective changes over time has led many to examine the question of “continuity of self” post-injury. Vacillation between feeling the same and different is common and often at odds with the medical narrative preparing families for permanent change. This position of ambiguity was examined in a qualitative narrative study. The aim of this paper is to describe the narrative structures used by uninjured members of a family to understand change. These changes relate primarily, to their perspective of whether and how the injured person had changed, but also secondarily to whether and why they themselves felt they had changed in the first year post-injury. Nine uninjured family members from three families took part in three unstructured interviews during the first twelve months post-injury.

In-depth narrative analysis showed family members used biographical attendance; biographical disruption; biographical continuity; and biographical reconstruction to understand change. Dr. Ellis-Hill and her co-authors argue that concentrating on a narrative of change is too limiting and that engaging in biographical narratives may help humanise care provided to injured individuals and their families. Implications for research and practice are discussed

Prof. Edwin van Teijlingen

CMMPH

Highly topical BU article on BREXIT

Congratulations to Dr. Rosie Read and Prof. Lee-Ann Fenge in the Faculty of Health & Social Sciences who just published in the academic journal Health and Social Care in the Community.  Their paper is called What does Brexit mean for the UK social care workforce? Perspectives from the recruitment and retention frontline’ [1].  You can’t have a more topical academic paper and it is freely available on the web through Open Access!  

The paper is based on research on research they undertook last year on the impact of Brexit on the social care workforce.  A key finding is that, irrespective of whether they employ EU/EEA workers or not, research participants have deep concerns about Brexit’s potential impact on the social care labour market. These include apprehensions about future restrictions on hiring EU/EEA nurses, as well as fears about increased competition for care staff and their organisation’s future financial viability. This article amplifies the voices of managers as an under‐researched group, bringing their perspectives on Brexit to bear on wider debates on social care workforce sustainability.

Congratulations!

Prof. Edwin van Teijlingen

 

Reference:

  1. Read R, Fenge L‐A. (2018) What does Brexit mean for the UK social care workforce? Perspectives from the recruitment and retention frontline.
    Health Soc Care Community [online first] :1–7.    https://doi.org/10.1111/hsc.12684

 

 

BU Humanising Practice SIG meeting

We are a group of academics and practitioners who have an interest in what makes us Feel Human and how this is linked to Health, Wellbeing, Dignity and Compassion. As part of the Centre for Qualitative Research CQR we use Lifeworld approaches, embodied knowing and subjective experience as the basis for our understanding. For more information please click here

At meetings we discuss issues following two presentations, and share our on-going work into humanising practice in education, practice and research.

Our next meeting is

On 6th December 2018, From 2pm to 4.30 pm, 

At Room B225 Bournemouth House Bournemouth University, Lansdowne Campus, (BH1 3LH)

We have two great presentations:

  • Humanising higher education by practicing with an embodied relational understanding. Dr Camila Devis-Rozental, Senior Lecturer, OVC, BU
  • Humanising education through digital stories: the human side of technology Dr Sue Baron Lecturer in Adult Nursing FHSS BU

All staff, students and external visitors are welcome

If you would like directions to the venue, have any queries OR If you are not already a member of the Humanising SIG e-mail list and would like to be informed of future events, please contact Caroline Ellis-Hill at cehill@bournemouth.ac.uk

Humanising Care, Health and Wellbeing conference

One week to go  to find out more about education, practice and research at the Humanising Care, Health and Wellbeing conference 21-22 June 2018

Please find the conference programme http://blogs.bournemouth.ac.uk/research/files/2018/06/18-06-13-Humanising-practice-programme-FIN.docx

If you would like to attend this conference at BU please register at https://humanisingcare2018.eventbrite.co.uk

This philosophically-driven approach to caring, health and wellbeing is based on humanising practice. Focusing on what make us feel human and what life feels like from the inside out (existential understandings from lifeworld approaches) provides novel approaches to consider issues relating to care, health and wellbeing.

Humanising practice is supported by work  settings which encourage connection to personal experience and research which privileges subjective experience and knowing; such as phenomenology, narrative, auto-ethnography, embodied knowing and arts–based approaches.

This is our fourth conference; people from previous conferences have said:

A fabulous conference. I leave this day feeling nutured…., inspired …. refreshed… glad to be human

I feel I have found my academic home, it’s a new home and I don’t know where everything is or where to put my ‘stuff’ , but it feels like home

It all fits ! So much lovely work is happening. The threads come together and support this work/idea/way of being. Loved hearing others’ stories and work in action

Thank-you for inviting me to participate –these are very powerful events

 

Humanising practice in Australia

Caroline Ellis-Hill  from the Centre for Qualitative Research  has been sharing her work at the 41st Australasian Society for the Study of Brain Impairment conference  in Adelaide.

I was privileged to be asked to be a keynote speaker taking about lifeworld led rehabilitation and also facilitate a practical workshop around staff wellbeing and Humanising practice, guided by a lifeworld approach. Participants enjoyed the workshop, as can be seen from the photograph! The theme of the conference was ‘Connecting and collaborating in rehabilitation’ and firm connections with researchers and clinicians in Australia and New Zealand will create a wonderful opportunity to collaborate across the globe.

I was also invited to be a visiting academic at the Living with Disability Research Centre, La Trobe University , Melbourne where I presented a seminar and met staff in the department. It was great to see what was happening in terms of service provision and disability culture in Australia. Our BU Humanising practice work was very well received and I’m looking forward to working with colleagues at La Trobe in the future.

To find out more around Humanising care, health and wellbeing please go to: https://research.bournemouth.ac.uk/2013/11/humanising-caring-health-and-wellbeing/

Humanising Care, Health and Wellbeing Conference: 21st & 22nd June

This is our fourth conference and due to huge success in the past years we would like to invite you to take part in this year’s conference which will take on the 21st & 22nd June 2018 at the Executive Business Centre in Lansdowne.

We have developed a philosophically driven approach to caring, health and wellbeing based on Humanising practices. It is based on existential understandings from lifeworld approaches and focuses on what make us feel human. Humanising practices (please click to read more) are those that incorporate fully human knowing and support a sense of connection and wellbeing.

This approach is supported by working practices which encourage connection to personal experience and research approaches which privilege subjective experience and knowing; such as phenomenology, narrative, auto-ethnography, embodied knowing and arts–based approaches.

For more information and tickets please visit:

https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/humanising-care-health-wellbeing-tickets-45585595744#tickets

Tickets include refreshments and lunch.

 

CQR Wed Seminar: The Personal Stories of a Methodology Study Group

The Personal Stories of a Methodology Study Group: An independent learning and support mechanism for postgrads

Come along and join in the conversation with the “Gang of Four”: Karen Cooper, Louise Oliver, Mandy Podee, and Jo Thurston.

The result was an enhanced depth of understanding of specific interpretive research methodologies as well as an unexpected support mechanism.

The group’s primary function was to support development of its understanding of methodologies and methods, but an unexpected secondary function was the reduction of a sense of isolation.

United through the fundamental overarching field of narrative research, four doctoral candidates with distinct topic areas were able to collaborate.  They not only enhanced their depth of understanding of specific interpretive research methodologies, but also provided support and encouragement to each other within the potentially isolating experience of postgraduate research study.

Centre for Qualitative Research

“In Conversation” Seminar Series

Humanising SIG meeting 5th April 2018

  A river moment in time

We are a group of scholars and practitioners who have an interest in what makes us Feel Human and how this is linked to Health, Wellbeing, Dignity and Compassion. As part of the Centre for Qualitative Research CQR we use Lifeworld approaches, embodied knowing and subjective experience as the basis for our understanding. For more information please click here

At meetings we discuss issues following two presentations, and share our on-going work into humanising practice in education, practice and research.

Our next meeting is

On April 5th 2018,  From 2pm to 4.30 pm, 

At EB303 Executive Business Centre Lansdowne Campus, Bournemouth University, 89 Holdenhurst Rd, Bournemouth BH8 8EB

The two presentations are

  • A hermeneutic phenomenological study of stroke survivors’ and healthcare practitioners’ lived experience of the acute stroke unit – Dr Kitty Suddick –Senior lecturer in Physiotherapy, Brighton University For more detials click here
  • Experiences of Humanising Care –  Caroline Bagnall -Clinical Specialist Speech and Language Therapist, and Stroke Research Practitioner at Royal Bournemouth Hospital, Bournemouth For more details click here

All staff, students and visitors are welcome

If you are not already a member of the Humanising SIG e-mail list and would like to be informed of future events, or would like to know more about this event,  please contact Caroline Ellis-Hill

BU Humanising Special Interest Group meeting 7th December 2017

We are a group of scholars and practitioners who have an interest in what makes us Feel Human and how this is linked to Health, Wellbeing, Dignity and Compassion. As part of the Centre for Qualitative Research CQR we use Lifeworld approaches and subjective experience as the basis for our understanding. For more information please click here

At meetings we discuss issues following two presentations, and share our on-going work into humanising practice in education, practice and research.

Our next meeting is

On December 7th 2017,  From 2pm to 4.30 pm,  At R303, Royal London House, Lansdowne Campus

The two presentations are

  • Comparing market and civil society thinking from the standpoint of humanising health and social care Dr Jim Cowan – independent researcher with 40 years’ experience as a community development practitioner
  •  Symmetrical and/or asymmetrical interacting: A grounded theory explaining the process of being a relative during their family member’s hospital admission in adult, medical areas of care. Sue Melling, Lecturer in Adult Nursing, Faculty of Health and Social Sciences, Bournemouth University If you are not already a member of the Humanising SIG e-mail list and would like to be, please contact Caroline Ellis-Hill
  • For further details of the topics and speakers  please click here
  • All staff, students and visitors are welcome

BU Research contributes to National Creativity, Arts, Health and Wellbeing report

Dr Caroline Ellis-Hill  from the Centre for Qualitative Research (CQR) and the Humanising practice SIG  (FHSS),  recently attended a discussion of the new All-Party Parliamentary Group (APPG) report on Arts, Health and Wellbeing Creative Health: The Arts for Health and Wellbeing at Kings College,  London.  Speakers included Darren Henley, Chief Executive of Arts Council England, Shirley Cramer, Chief Executive of the Royal Society for Public Health, Lord Howarth of Newport and Ed Vaizey MP, co-Chairs of the APPG.

Caroline contributed to one of the parliamentary inquiry meetings and also led the  HeART of stroke study which is cited in the report, and which was funded through the National Institute for Health Research – Research for Patient Benefit (NIHR-RfPB) funding programme.  The research was carried out with colleagues from Bournemouth University Clinical Research Unit (BUCRU) and many external stakeholders including NIHR, the Royal Bournemouth and Christchurch Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Cambridgeshire Community Services NHS Trust and the University of East Anglia.

The APPG report is a landmark document that brings together available evidence from across the UK to support the role of the arts in the health and wellbeing of people across the life-course. The report has ten recommendations which will be considered at national and local policy level, with the aim of promoting the arts within mainstream services when considering health and wellbeing in the future.

BU midwifery research at the international Normal birth research conference

The Normal birth research conference is an annual, international event that takes place to focus on less complicated aspects of pregnancy and birth. This year it took place in the beautiful surroundings of Grange-over-sands overlooking Morecambe bay and on the edge of the Lake District. On this occasion there were delegates from over 20 countries including Canada, USA, New Zealand, Australia, Brazil, Poland, Spain, the Netherlands, Sweden, Norway and India! The attendees included midwives, obstetricians, birth supporters, architects, artists, geographers and educators as well as representatives of the World Health organisation, charities and Baroness Cumberlege from the UK House of Lords.

Sara Stride, Jenny Hall, and Jane Fry at the conference

Research at Bournemouth University was well represented from CMMPH, CQR and CEL. Midwifery lecturer, Sara stride, on behalf of the research team of Professor Vanora Hundley and Dr Sue Way, presented a poster of their work, ‘a qualitative study to explore UK midwives’ individual practice, beliefs and attitudes regarding perineal care at the time of birth’. Dr Jane Fry, also from the midwifery team, presented a research topic on her Doctoral work, ‘ A descriptive phenomenological study of independent midwives’ use of intuition as an authoritative form of knowledge during women’s labours and births’.  She also facilitated a workshop titled ‘ Finding your own intuition: a workshop designed to explore practitioners’ ways of knowing during childbirth’ .

 

Jenny Hall with Professor Susan Crowther at the book launch [(c) Sheena Byrom]

Dr Jenny Hall presented a research topic based on recent research with Dr Bethan Collins from Liverpool University, Professor Vanora Hundley and Jilly Ireland, midwife and visiting researcher, ‘How can we improve the ‘normal’ childbirth experience of disabled women?’. She also facilitated a workshop with a colleague from RGU, Aberdeen, Professor Susan Crowther, ‘Spirituality and childbirth: bringing a felt-sense into childbirth- a co-operative inquiry’. In addition, her new internationally authored book jointly edited with Professor Crowther, ‘Spirituality and Childbirth: Meaning and care at the start of life’, was officially launched at the conference.

The impression taken away was the passion and importance of more evidence required around more ‘normal’ aspects of pregnancy and birth, especially in countries with less resources. There is considerable humanising of care being carried out internationally, and is a key focus at the World health organisation. A focus for the UK midwifery is current maternity services transformation, yet much of the global focus is on the importance of transformation in line with the recent Lancet series on maternity, and international collaboration to achieve the goals for Sustainable development. As a force, the team behind normal birth research serve this area powerfully, in informing care for women, babies and families across the global arena. The final rousing talk by Australian professor Hannah Dahlen, to the current backlash to ‘normal birth’ in the media was inspiring and is an editorial in the international journal Women and Birth. Next year the conference is in Michigan, USA!

Humanisation Special Interest Group meeting BU 11th April 2017

We are a group of scholars and practitioners who have an interest in what makes us Feel Human and how this is linked to Health, Wellbeing, Dignity and Compassion. We use Lifeworld approaches and subjective experience as the basis for our understanding. For more information please click here

At meetings we discuss issues following two presentations, and share our on-going work into humanisation in education, practice and research.

Our next meeting is

On April 11th 2017,  From 2pm to 4.30 pm,  At Lansdowne Campus, EB202

The two presentations are

  •  The relatives’ experience of acquired brain injury and the humanising role of the Expert Companion Mark Holloway – Brain Injury Case Manager Head First, SSCR Fellow
  •  Using photography to encourage introspection among GPs Rutherford – Senior Lecturer, Bournemouth University

If you are not already  a member of the Humanisation SIG e-mail group and would like to be, please contact Caroline Ellis-Hill 

For further details of the topics and speakers  please click here

All Staff and Students are welcome

New edition qualitative research book

hollowaygalvin-2017Congratulations to BU Professor Emerita Immy Holloway and FHSS (Faculty of Health & Social Sciences) Visiting Faculty Professor Kathleen Galvin on the publication of the latest edition of Qualitative Research in Nursing and Healthcare [1].  This new edition offers insights into both the abstract ideas in qualitative research and its practical procedures. Structured into four sections, the new edition looks at the initial stages, methods of data collection, qualitative approaches and analysis of collected data.  Professor Galvin is Professor of Nursing Practice in the College of Life, Health & Physical Sciences, at the University of Brighton.  Both Immy Holloway and Kate Galvin are affiliated with BU’s Centre for Qualitative Research (CQR), the longest running research centre in FHSS.

 

Congratulations!

Prof. Edwin van Teijlingen

 

Reference:

  1. Holloway I & Galvin K. (2017) Qualitative Research in Nursing and Healthcare. Wiley-Blackwell 4th ed.

 

RUFUS STONE to be Highlighted at ESRC Festival of Learning on the 7th November

esrc-fest

You are cordially invited to attend the gala 5th Anniversary Screening and Reception for the award-winning research based biopic, RUFUS STONE.

The Event will be held at the historic Shelley Theatre in Boscombe              

7 November from 3 p.m. until 5 p.m.

rufus-shelley

Over the past five years, RUFUS STONE has been viewed in academic, community and service provider settings throughout the U.K. Uploaded to the Internet for just over a year, the film was viewed on line by more that 12 thousand viewers in 150 countries. It has won serveral film festival awards and was shortlisted for the AHRC Anniversary Prize in 2015.

The three-year research project behind the film’s success was part of the New Dynamics Programme of ageing in 21st Century Britain, supported by Research Councils UK. This event will hallmark this achievement and continue the film’s impact in the wider community.

We expect the gala event to atract an audience of the film’s cast and crew members, past participants in the research project, community workers and service providers, and a range of citizens, young and old, gay and straight, with an interest in LGBT history and the contributions that the film has made to myriad diversity efforts. Whether you have seen the film before, or this will be the first time on a large theatre screen, you will enjoy the occasion.

R.S.V.P. Places are limited to 150 seats only! Please register on the Eventbrite site as soon as possible to avoid being disappointed.

skip-harry

Congratulations to Dr. Caroline Ellis-Hill

NIHRDr. Caroline Ellis-Hill  has just been accepted as a qualitative methodologist on the NIHR (National Institute for Health Research) panel for Programme Grants for Applied Research (PGfAR).  Caroline from the Centre for Qualitative Research (CQR) in FHSS is the second BU academic to join a NIHR panel this year.  Earlier this year Prof. Edwin van Teijlingen was invited to be a member of the NIHR’s HTA Clinical Evaluation & Trials Board ( http://www.nets.nihr.ac.uk/programmes/hta/our-people ).

Congratulations!

Professors Vanora Hundley & Edwin van Teijlingen

CMMPH