Tagged / department of nursing sciences

Dealing with difficult reviewers

This week saw the publication of another Bournemouth University paper on academic writing and publishing.  This latest paper ‘Struggling to reply to reviewers: Some advice for novice researchers‘ has been published in the scientific journal Health Prospect: Journal of Public Health.  This  journal is published in Nepal and it is Open Access, hence freely available across the globe.

Peer review is the process by which academic journals assess and regulate the quality of content they publish, by inviting academic experts to review your submitted manuscripts.  It is a process of quality control. Once you have submitted your paper to a journal the editor will select potential peer reviewers within the field of research to peer-review your manuscript and make recommendations. In many case the peer review process can be a positive experience for you as it allows you to develop your skills and improve your written work.  For example, good reviewers may notice potential imbalances, point out missing key references or highlight different potential perspectives, and thus help you to enhance the overall quality of the paper.  On some occasions, however a reviewer can be a complete pain in the neck!

The paper is written by a multidisciplinary team based in the Department of Nursing Sciences (Dr. Regmi), the Department of Social Sciences and Social Work (Dr. Harvey), and the Department of Midwifery & Health Sciences (Dr. Taylor & Prof. van Teijlingen).  The authors bring their combined expertise in midwifery, social work, health education, sociology and health services research to offers the readers advice how to deal with the more difficult reviewers.

 

Reference:

  1. Harvey, O., Taylor, A., Regmi, P.R., van Teijlingen, E. (2022) Struggling to reply to reviewers: Some advice for novice researchers Health Prospect: Journal of Public Health 21(2):19-22

Accelerating excellence for nurses: a visiting keynote talk from James A King

Our student nurses had a change of  tutor this week, with James King, author of ‘Accelerating Excellence:  the Principles that drive elite performance’ coming in to offer a keynote to set up their day. James outlined, through numerous examples, how to drive up our performance, whether we are studying, working, or trying to move to that healthier lifestyle! His main message was that it is elite performers do not simply add more and more hours to improve, but they change their mindset, and train in the ‘sweet spot’. He followed through with some clear principles about moving from ambition to follow through. Media student Sam Pickle came along to film the session, and kindly took the photos of James.

One student said afterwards: ‘I wish we had James talk to us in the first year, his messages are so clear, and it would have really helped me get into the mindset

and with the film on its way, we can share James’ work more widely.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

About the book:

In Accelerating Excellence James King draws on his fifteen years of experience as a trusted advisor to some of the worlds most elite and exclusive organisations combined with cutting edge scientific research to reveal the foundational principles that are proven to drive elite performance. This inspiring book is bursting with highly actionable strategies you can apply today that will make you better tomorrow.

You will learn how to:- Align with the principles all outlier performers have leveraged in order to obtain and sustain elite performance- Ignite your psychological firepower and unleash the inner confidence, motivation and resilience that we all know drive success. – Apply a methodology that will channel your ambition, talent and effort so allowing you to get better faster.- Rapidly acquire skills that stick blowing the 10,000-hour rule out the water. – Win the head game mastering your emotions so you can access your best when it matters most – Generate breakthrough solutions to innovate and stay ahead of the rest. Accelerating Excellence will revolutionise the way you perceive excellence, potential and talent, crushing some of the most entrenched assumptions along the way. You will emerge inspired about the possibility that exists before you, enriched with purpose, structure and direction along with a biological and psychological edge over the competition.

Sharon Holland and Debbie Holley