Category / BU research

PGR Virtual Poster Exhibition | Faisal Alsubaie

The 13th Annual Postgraduate Research Conference, hosted by the Doctoral College.

Faisal Alsubaie (PhD, BUBS) with this poster entitled: The effect of cultural tightness-looseness on tourism destination choice for Western Europeans: Evidence from Saudi Arabia.

Click the poster below to enlarge.

This study addresses the question “How do the changes in cultural tightness–looseness (CTL) influence the perceptions of Western European tourists and their willingness to visit Saudi Arabia (SA)”? To answer this research question, the study adopts a research design of two phases sequential mixed method; (1) first phase employs a quantitative survey to measurement the tourists’ perceptions of the recent changes in cultural tightness (i.e., the strength of cultural norms and tolerance for deviant behaviour) and their impacts on their intention to visit SA. (2) the second phase employs a qualitative semi-structured interviews to get an in-depth explanation of the findings of the first phase of the study. This study contributes to the literature by developing a framework using CTL theory to investigate the effects of CTL on tourism destination choice in a Saudi context which has not been examined before.


You can view the full poster exhibition and pre-recorded presentations on the conference webpage.

If this research has inspired you and you’d like to explore applying for a research degree please visit the postgraduate research web pages or contact the Doctoral College dedicated admissions team.

PGR Virtual Poster Exhibition | Ceyda Kiyak

The 13th Annual Postgraduate Research Conference, hosted by the Doctoral College.

Ceyda Kiyak (MRes, FST) with this poster entitled: Minimising online gambling related harm through persuasive technologies.

Click the poster below to enlarge.

How effective are the various types of interactions in breaking through disassociation of at-risk and social gamblers?  After identifying whether the participant is at-risk or social gambler with The Problem Gambling Severity Index on an online survey, fifty participants will be invited to the lab experiment. Participants will be given two tablet devices: on the first device they will play the gambling session with virtual money for 20 min; on the second device, participants will be randomised to five different interactions (experimental groups: cognitive tasks, interactive dialogue, infographic; control groups: neutral interaction, no interaction). Participants will then complete Jacob’s Disassociation Questionnaire, acceptability, and demographic questionnaire. The results of this research may enable prevention and intervention strategies in problem gambling. Moreover, it will allow gambling industry and policymakers to better develop responsible gambling applications and may even lead a policy change.


You can view the full poster exhibition and pre-recorded presentations on the conference webpage.

If this research has inspired you and you’d like to explore applying for a research degree please visit the postgraduate research web pages or contact our dedicated admissions team.

PGR Virtual Poster Exhibition | Daniel Dimanov

The 13th Annual Postgraduate Research Conference, hosted by the Doctoral College.

Daniel Dimanov (PhD, FST) with this poster entitled: MONCAE: Multi-Objective Neuroevolution of Convolutional Autoencoders.

Click the poster below to enlarge.

With this poster, we present a novel neuroevolutionary method to identify the architecture and hyperparameters of convolutional autoencoders, which has been published in an ICLR workshop. Remarkably, we used a hypervolume indicator employing neuroevolution for in the context of neural architecture search for autoencoders, for the first time to the best of our knowledge. We rely on novel decoding of the architecture to automatically reconstruct the decoder from the encoding. We tested our approach with MNIST, Fashion-MNIST and CIFAR10 to verify the performance of the approach. Results show that images were compressed by a factor of more than 10, while still retaining enough information to achieve image classification for the majority of the tasks. Thus, this new approach can be used to speed up the AutoML pipeline for image compression and much more.


You can view the full poster exhibition and pre-recorded presentations on the conference webpage.

If this research has inspired you and you’d like to explore applying for a research degree please visit the postgraduate research web pages or contact the Doctoral College dedicated admissions team.

PGR Virtual Poster Exhibition | Abier Hamidi

The 13th Annual Postgraduate Research Conference, hosted by the Doctoral College.

Abier Hamidi (PhD, FHSS) with this poster entitled: HIV epidemic in Libya: Identifying gaps.

Click the poster below to enlarge.

HIV (human immunodeficiency virus) became a public issue in Libya after the infection of 400 children in El-Fatih Hospital in 1988. Due to the civil war, social and religious barriers, HIV prevalence is hard to establish, but it is generally believed to be increasing.  This review (a) assesses the size and scope of the available literature on the HIV epidemic in Libya; and, (b) identifies the nature and extent of research conducted to date. A comprehensive search was performed using PubMed, Medline, Web of Science, ScienceDirect, Scopus, Academic Search Ultimate, Cochrane Library and Google Scholar.  Primary research studies and official reports that are exclusively on Libya published during 1988 -2021 were considered.  In total 25 studies were included. The literature suggests there is an increase in HIV infection rates in Libya.  Culturally sensitive research will assist in reducing HIV stigma and decreasing infection rates.


You can view the full poster exhibition and pre-recorded presentations on the conference webpage.

If this research has inspired you and you’d like to explore applying for a research degree please visit the postgraduate research web pages or contact the Doctoral College dedicated admissions team.

Launching Next Week – Doctoral College PGR Virtual Research Exhibition

 

Over the next fortnight, as part of the Doctoral College Annual PGR Conference and BU Research Week, we will be showcasing a wide range of postgraduate research taking place at BU in the form of a virtual research exhibition.

Each day across the two week period, starting on Monday, you will be able to view research posters and pre-recorded presentations from our postgraduate researchers across all Faculties.

You can also register to attend the live online Annual PGR Conference, taking place on Wednesday 1 December, and you can now view the full conference brochure and programme. Come along and support BU’s postgraduate research community. All welcome!

If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to get in touch.

Natalie (Research Skills & Development Officer)

How to ensure your research has impact: new online workshop for 2021/22

Planning for impact: Thursday 2nd December: 9:30-11:30 Online

If you want to ensure your research makes a real-world difference, book now onto this RKEDF interactive online workshop. This training is also useful for anyone applying for this year’s call for the Research Impact Fund (closing date: 10th December). Early career researchers are welcome to attend, and the session is suitable for any career stage.

Impact consultant Saskia Gent, director of Insights for Impact, explains: “This is a hands-on, practical workshop with exercises supporting researchers to build a draft impact plan.” You will learn how to create a strategic plan for embedding impact in your research at any stage in the research lifecycle by:

  • identifying relevant stakeholders
  • developing impact goals
  • understanding the different types of impact that can arise from your research
  • identifying evidence sources.

Book your place.

 

Wessex REACH Initiative – Peer support grant

The Wessex REACH Initiative was formally launched in the summer and their first newsletter can be found here.

Wessex REACH are offering a small amount of funding to groups of researchers who wish to create a space for thinking, connecting and problem solving with their peers.  By coming together in face-to-face peer group meetings, research ideas and local problems can be discussed, common challenges and possible solutions can be shared and learn from one another. Whether you want to meet for afternoon tea away from the office a few times a year or fund a grant writing away day or any other creative solution that suits your group, they are interested in receiving your applications.

Who is eligible?
Anyone currently working in healthcare, social care or in healthcare-related research in Wessex.

How much is available?
Each group can apply for up to £500 to be used over a 1 year period.  They are aiming to fund up to 4 groups in the first round.  All applications will be reviewed by the Wessex REACH Steering Group and successful applicants notified early in 2022.

How to apply?
Send a short summary (up to 500 words) to info@wessexreach.org.uk by 10 December 2021.  This summary should include the following information, which will be used in the shortlisting process:

  • Contact details for your group or an expression of interest in being part of a group in your area
  • Your reasons for applying and how the award will help to build research capacity in your group
  • Your planned event(s)/activity
  • What your group is hoping to achieve and how it aligns with building research capacity in the Wessex region
  • What facilitation support, if any, you would like from the Wessex REACH Exec Committee (https://www.wessexreach.org.uk/meet-the-team  )
  • Requested total budget

Questions
If you would like to discuss your eligibility or plans prior to applying please contact Beth Stuart (bls1@soton.ac.uk)

New journal article: Applying psychotherapy concepts to physical activity interventions for older adults

Back in July 2021, I posted a blog detailing the outcomes of a qualitative study exploring how the LiveWell Dorset behaviour change service influences older adults’ physical activity behaviour, as part of the wider Active Ageing Evaluation project. One of the key findings of this study was that participants valued the social support they received from LiveWell Dorset coaches, and their kind, non-judgmental and empathetic manner.

Largely inspired by this finding, I have subsequently written a narrative review article, which puts forward the novel idea, with wider supporting evidence, that the nature of the relationship between professional and client, a concept drawn from the field of psychotherapy and known as therapeutic alliance, may be a vital and foundational element of effective PA interventions for older adults.

The article has just been published in Journal of Aging and Physical Activity, and can be found here.

– Andy Powell (Lead investigator, Active Ageing Evaluation project)

Register to attend the Annual Postgraduate Research Conference  – Wednesday 1 December.

Register to attend the Annual Postgraduate Research Conference  – all welcome!

Come along to support our postgraduate research community at the Annual Postgraduate Research Conference, Wednesday 1 December 2021, 09:30 – 17:30. Oral presentations will be hosted on Zoom.

You are also invited to FG06 during the day to network, and for PGRs we will be offering the opportunity to get a free professional headshot during the lunch break.

There will be a virtual poster exhibition on the BU website and across the blogs during the week of the conference with further pre-recorded presentations available to view at your leisure.

The full brochure, with all presenters and presentation types, will be circulated shortly. In the meantime, please see the live presentation conference programme for the day below.

It would be great to see many of you there. If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to get in touch: pgconference@bournemouth.ac.uk. 


Natalie Stewart (Research Skills & Development Officer), Doctoral College.

Introducing the Early Career Researcher Network

Our established network of Early Career Researchers extends across the faculties. It provides support to Early Career Researchers from the experienced academic leaders of the network, Dr. Sam Goodman, and Prof. Ann Hemingway, as well as from peers, and highlights the support available from the Research Development and Support department and other BU teams. It also, as the name suggests, provides a forum for networking and making connections that can be of great benefit to an academic’s research career.

We have monthly networking events. We plan to continue holding them online for the time being, with a view to trialling at least a couple of hybrid events later in this academic year. We have a mix of themed discussions, (on topics like career planning, dealing with imposter syndrome, managing your profile as a researcher), plus open surgeries with more general Q&A.

For a more animated introduction, here is a short video of Sam and Ann talking about the network.

If you are not already a member of the network but would like to be, or if you have any queries, please contact RKEDF@bournemouth.ac.uk. No restrictions apply, as long as you identify yourself as someone in the early stages of their research career.

To have a look at what sessions are on, and to book onto any of them, please see here.

FMC research process seminar this Tuesday. Classifying Emotions in Images: Humans versus Computers. All welcome

In the FMC Research Process Seminar Series, this week we welcome Dr Michael Bossetta, Assistant Professor in the Department of Communication and Media at Lund University.

His talk is on: “Classifying Emotions in Images: Humans versus Computers” which should be of interest to many colleagues from across disciplines. Summary below:

There seems to be a renewed interest in emotions from political and communication scholars. In this talk, I’ll provide examples of existing approaches to study emotions, as well as my experiences using computer vision to classify emotions in politicians’ social media images. That entails, first, discussing how to manage, sort, and deduplicate thousands of images. Then, I’ll show examples of where computer vision performs well and poorly. I’ll also share some preliminary results into how computers stack up against human judgements of emotions. In wrapping up, the strengths and weaknesses of applying computer vision for emotions research will be discussed.

Tuesday 23 November at 2pm on Zoom. 

https://bournemouth-ac-uk.zoom.us/j/9292103478?pwd=UzJnNTNQWDdTNldXdjNWUnlTR1cxUT09

Meeting ID: 929 210 3478

Passcode: rps!4fmc

These seminars are approx 60 mins long and are focussed on the process of doing research – with the aim of sharing good practice and making us better researchers.

All welcome

Hope to see you there

Dan Jackson and Sae Oshima