Category / REF Subjects

Individual feedback survey on the REF 2021

Have your say on the Research Excellence Framework 2021 as part of the Future Research Assessment Programme, conducted by Research England, Scottish Funding Council, Higher Education Funding Council for Wales, and Department for the Economy, Northern Ireland.

The Programme is keen to understand the impact of the REF 2021 on the research community, and are asking for responses to a survey from any individuals with an interest or involvement in REF 2021. The survey will be open until 26th January 2022 and can be accessed here.

Call for International Talents in AI and Creative Technologies – CfACTs Recruitment

Bournemouth University will support international researchers to embark on three projects to develop machine learning and artificial intelligence driven solutions to tackle challenges in computer graphics community and digital creative industry. Research experience related to CNN, GAN, image processing, and computer vision are valued. The action is supported by EU Marie Skłodowska-Curie Actions (MSCA) COFUND scheme. The projects are hosted at the National Centre for Computer Animation and partnered with world leading VFX companies, including Framestore and Humain.

The recruitment for three postdoctoral roles is open till 27th Mar, 2022. Please feel free to distribute the news around.

Key words: Machine Learning, Artificial Intelligence, CNN, GAN, Rendering, Hair Modelling, Facial Modelling

Eligible applicants must:

  • Not have resided or carried out their main activity (e.g., work, study) in the UK for more than 12 months in the three years immediately prior to the call deadline
  • Be in possession of a doctorate or have at least four years full-time equivalent research experience.

Potential applicants can now register their interest via: https://forms.office.com/r/nyGC5pJTpq

More details are available at the CfACTs webpage www.bournemouth.ac.uk/CfACTs-Research

To apply the jobs, please visit:

https://www.bournemouth.ac.uk/cfacts-postdoctoral-research-fellow-machine-learning-artificial-intelligence-computer-generated-images-fixed-term-3-positions-available

For any enquiries, please feel free to email: cFACTs-enquiries@bournemouth.ac.uk

Call for EoIs: Impact Champion for UOA 11 (Computer Science and Informatics)

An opportunity has arisen for an Impact Champion for Unit of Assessment (UOA) 11 (Computer Science and Informatics) to help drive preparations for the next REF. This role would initially be until summer 2022.BU is making early preparations towards units of assessment (UOAs) for the next Research Excellence Framework (REF) exercise. Each UOA has a UOA Leader, supported by Impact and Outputs Champions.  The roles are recruited through an open and transparent process, which gives all academic staff the opportunity to put themselves forward for UOA Leader roles.We are currently seeking expressions of interest (EoI) from academic staff interested in supporting impact development for UOA 11 (Computer Science and Informatics). Impact Champions play a key role in shaping the impact element of their UOA’s submission, working closely with their Faculty’s Impact Advisor.Key responsibilities of the Impact Champion role include:

  • Early detection of potential impact case studies
  • Review the development of impact case studies being prepared within the UOA
  • Provide guidance on how impact case studies can be accelerated and evidenced
  • Advise colleagues on the REF impact guidelines
  • Review impact strategies related to the UOA and assess progress made against them
  • Review and implement recommendations from external research users to strengthen research impact
  • Ensure that colleagues are updating institutional systems for impact tracking
  • Promote relevant training and development opportunities
  • Review impact arising from major programmes of research and knowledge exchange to make recommendations as to how these can contribute to impact case studies
  • Advise on the use of appropriate metrics specific to the subject area
  • To help embed a culture of research impact
  • To undertake any other duties as requested by the relevant Deputy Dean for Research and Professional Practice (DDR&PP) and/or Unit of Assessment leader.

Application process:

To apply for one of the Impact Champion roles, please submit a short statement (suggested length 300 words) explaining your interest in the role and what you could bring to it. This should be sent by email to Professor Hamid Bouchachia by 21st December 2021.  The EoIs will be reviewed by the UOA Leader and DDR&PP.

The selection criteria used at EoI are outlined below. Each criterion carries a total possible score of 5. The role will be offered to the highest scoring applicant. A member of the panel will provide feedback to all applicants.

  • Knowledge of the REF and research impact (scored out of 5): Applicants should have the appropriate level of skill and knowledge to help them support the development of impact in their UOA. It is expected that Impact Champions will predominantly be practising researchers and will have a breadth of understanding of research across their Faculty.  They are also expected to have an understanding of the REF assessment process and of research impact.
  • Experience of external engagement and / or impact development (scored out of 5): Impact Champions are expected to be able to provide advice and direction to colleagues who want to develop their research impact. Experience of engaging with external organisations or developing your own research impact would be of benefit in this role.
  • Commitment, motivation and enthusiasm (scored out of 5): Being an Impact Champion is a big commitment and the role has the scope to help shape impact development at BU. Applicants need to be committed to the role, as well as showing the enthusiasm and motivation needed to support their UOA.

A  role description is available here: UOA Impact Champion Role Descriptor-Nov 2021.

Call for EoIs: Outputs Champion for UOA 11 (Computer Science and Informatics)

An opportunity has arisen for an Outputs Champion for Unit of Assessment (UOA) 11 (Computer Science and Informatics) to help drive preparations for the next REF. This role would initially be until summer 2022.BU is making early preparations towards units of assessment (UOAs) for the next Research Excellence Framework (REF) exercise. Each UOA has a UOA Leader, supported by Impact and Outputs Champions.  The roles are recruited through an open and transparent process, which gives all academic staff the opportunity to put themselves forward for UOA Leader roles.We are currently seeking expressions of interest (EoI) from academic staff interested in supporting outputs development for UOA 11 (Computer Science and Informatics).

Output Champions play a key role in shaping the output element of their UoA’s submission.  Key responsibilities of the Output Champion role include:

  • Support the development of research outputs being prepared within the UOA
  • Provide guidance on how research outputs can be produced and published
  • Advise colleagues on the REF output guidelines specifically those in relation to assessment, open access and research metrics
  • Review output strategies related to the UOA and assess progress made against them
  • Ensure that colleagues are updating institutional systems such as BRIAN and BURO
  • Promote Open Access publication and use of the Open Access Publication Fund as appropriate
  • Promote relevant training and development opportunities
  • Review outputs arising from major programmes of research and knowledge exchange to make recommendations as to how these can contribute to the UoAs output profile
  • Work with Post-Doctoral Research Fellows on REF Output related activity as appropriate.

Application process:

To apply for the role, please submit a short statement (suggested length 300 words) explaining your interest in the role and what you could bring to it. This should be sent by email to Professor Hamid Bouchachia by 21 December 2021.  The EoIs will be reviewed by the UoA Leader and DDR&PP.

The selection criteria used at EoI are outlined below. Each criterion carries a total possible score of 5. The role will be offered to the highest scoring applicant. The UoA Leader will provide feedback to all applicants.

  • Knowledge of the REF  (scored out of 5): Applicants should have the appropriate level of skill and knowledge to help them support the development of outputs in their UoA. It is expected that Output Champions will predominantly be practising researchers and will have a breadth of understanding of research across their Faculty.  They are also expected to have an understanding of the REF assessment process and of research outputs and open access.
  • Experience of output development (scored out of 5): Output Champions are expected to be able to provide advice and direction to colleagues who want to develop their research outputs.
  • Commitment, motivation and enthusiasm (scored out of 5): Being an Output Champion is a big commitment and the role has the scope to help shape output development at BU. Applicants need to be committed to the role, as well as showing the enthusiasm and motivation needed to support their UoA.

A  role description is available here: Outputs Champion Role

Call for EoIs: Impact Champion for UOA 20 (Social Work and Social Policy)

An opportunity has arisen for an Impact Champion for Unit of Assessment (UOA) 20 (Social Work and Social Policy) to help drive preparations for the next REF. This role would initially be until summer 2022.BU is making early preparations towards units of assessment (UOAs) for the next Research Excellence Framework (REF) exercise. Each UOA has a UOA Leader, supported by Impact and Outputs Champions.  The roles are recruited through an open and transparent process, which gives all academic staff the opportunity to put themselves forward for UOA Leader roles.We are currently seeking expressions of interest (EoI) from academic staff interested in supporting impact development for UOA 20 (Social Work and Social Policy). Impact Champions play a key role in shaping the impact element of their UOA’s submission, working closely with their Faculty’s Impact Advisor.

Key responsibilities of the Impact Champion role include:

  • Early detection of potential impact case studies
  • Review the development of impact case studies being prepared within the UOA
  • Provide guidance on how impact case studies can be accelerated and evidenced
  • Advise colleagues on the REF impact guidelines
  • Review impact strategies related to the UOA and assess progress made against them
  • Review and implement recommendations from external research users to strengthen research impact
  • Ensure that colleagues are updating institutional systems for impact tracking
  • Promote relevant training and development opportunities
  • Review impact arising from major programmes of research and knowledge exchange to make recommendations as to how these can contribute to impact case studies
  • Advise on the use of appropriate metrics specific to the subject area
  • To help embed a culture of research impact
  • To undertake any other duties as requested by the relevant Deputy Dean for Research and Professional Practice (DDR&PP) and/or Unit of Assessment leader.

Application process:

To apply for one of the Impact Champion roles, please submit a short statement (suggested length 300 words) explaining your interest in the role and what you could bring to it. This should be sent by email to Professor Jonathan Parker by 21st December 2021.  The EoIs will be reviewed by the UOA Leader and DDR&PP.

The selection criteria used at EoI are outlined below. Each criterion carries a total possible score of 5. The role will be offered to the highest scoring applicant. A member of the panel will provide feedback to all applicants.

  • Knowledge of the REF and research impact (scored out of 5): Applicants should have the appropriate level of skill and knowledge to help them support the development of impact in their UOA. It is expected that Impact Champions will predominantly be practising researchers and will have a breadth of understanding of research across their Faculty.  They are also expected to have an understanding of the REF assessment process and of research impact.
  • Experience of external engagement and / or impact development (scored out of 5): Impact Champions are expected to be able to provide advice and direction to colleagues who want to develop their research impact. Experience of engaging with external organisations or developing your own research impact would be of benefit in this role.
  • Commitment, motivation and enthusiasm (scored out of 5): Being an Impact Champion is a big commitment and the role has the scope to help shape impact development at BU. Applicants need to be committed to the role, as well as showing the enthusiasm and motivation needed to support their UOA.

A  role description is available here: UOA Impact Champion Role Descriptor-Nov 2021.

Student Research Writing Retreat

The Department of Sport and Event Management has this week hosted a student writing retreat for 50 Level 6 BA Events Management students who are writing their dissertations. Students have been attending fortnightly lectures in addition to their supervisory sessions, but this week came together to work collaboratively on writing up their literature reviews.

The retreats utilised the shared working spaces available in the Fusion building offering 4 hours of quiet working space in seminar rooms, supported by online targeted workshops and 1-1 support on balcony spaces.

At the outset students were invited to set their objectives for the session and curate their own programme of activities to achieve this. Professor Janet Dickinson offered online workshops on literature review writing techniques, whilst experienced supervisors (Dr Miguel Moital, Dr Katherine King and Dr Paola Vizcaino) provided 1-1 support for students to sign up and discuss their progress, helping them to problem solve in the moment.

In addition to this academic support, BUBS librarian Louise Tucker provided 1-1 library support sessions, helping students to focus their research strategies. Amada Fripp, Careers Advisor also attended giving tips and advice on ‘Making the most of your final year’ with CareersBU.

This was the first of 3 writing retreats run for Level 6 students throughout the year and student feedback indicated that working alongside of their peers and course staff at these sessions really helped them to move their research forward. Next sessions will focus on developing methodologies and a further session will support analysis and the final write up.

Peer-reviewing ten years on

The process of peer review is widely recognised as the key element of quality control in academic publishing and the scientific community more generally.  Peer review is the critical appraisal of one’s work by fellow scholars, who read and comment on your manuscript and offered a verdict on its quality, rigour, originality, style, completeness, etc. etc.

Peer reviewers are typically experts in your field, if not your topic, or who have expertise in the methods you applied or the population or are you studied.  They are also academics often with busy day jobs, who act as unpaid peer reviewers, and as journal editors for that matter.  Peer reviewers are with full-time jobs who give up their free time to review for academic journals.  A recent article by Aczel and colleagues (2021) reported that reviewers across the globe spent over 100 million hours on peer reviewing for free in 2020, the estimated value of this equated to nearly £300 million in the UK alone.  This quantifies in some of my feelings I wrote about a decade ago now in a BU Research Blog with the title ‘Peer review and bust academics’.

However, with the ever-growing number of health and social science journals the requests for reviewing seem to grow relentlessly.  This month alone (November 2021) I received twenty or 21 requests to review.  I have reviewed three manuscripts for Birth, Nepal Journal of Epidemiology, and The Journal of International Development, but I had to reject or ignore many more (see Table 1).  I usually do my reviews over the weekend.  One weekend this month I could not review because I had to prepare materials for the external auditor who came to visit Bournemouth University for a project recently completed, and this weekend I could not find the time because I’m proof-reading two PhD chapters (and writing this blog).

I leave you with some food for thought: academics spent time applying for research funding, then apply for the ethical approval, do the research, we write up the findings, and write blogs about the process!

 

Prof. Edwin van Teijlingen

Centre for Midwifery, Maternal & Perinatal Health (CMMPH)

 

Reference:

Aczel, B., Szaszi, B., Holcombe, A.O. (2021) A billion-dollar donation: estimating the cost of researchers’ time spent on peer review. Res Integr Peer Rev 6, 14. https://doi.org/10.1186/s41073-021-00118-2.

Wessex REACH Initiative – Peer support grant

The Wessex REACH Initiative was formally launched in the summer and their first newsletter can be found here.

Wessex REACH are offering a small amount of funding to groups of researchers who wish to create a space for thinking, connecting and problem solving with their peers.  By coming together in face-to-face peer group meetings, research ideas and local problems can be discussed, common challenges and possible solutions can be shared and learn from one another. Whether you want to meet for afternoon tea away from the office a few times a year or fund a grant writing away day or any other creative solution that suits your group, they are interested in receiving your applications.

Who is eligible?
Anyone currently working in healthcare, social care or in healthcare-related research in Wessex.

How much is available?
Each group can apply for up to £500 to be used over a 1 year period.  They are aiming to fund up to 4 groups in the first round.  All applications will be reviewed by the Wessex REACH Steering Group and successful applicants notified early in 2022.

How to apply?
Send a short summary (up to 500 words) to info@wessexreach.org.uk by 10 December 2021.  This summary should include the following information, which will be used in the shortlisting process:

  • Contact details for your group or an expression of interest in being part of a group in your area
  • Your reasons for applying and how the award will help to build research capacity in your group
  • Your planned event(s)/activity
  • What your group is hoping to achieve and how it aligns with building research capacity in the Wessex region
  • What facilitation support, if any, you would like from the Wessex REACH Exec Committee (https://www.wessexreach.org.uk/meet-the-team  )
  • Requested total budget

Questions
If you would like to discuss your eligibility or plans prior to applying please contact Beth Stuart (bls1@soton.ac.uk)

This Sunday is a midwifery day

Today Sunday 21st November was a midwifery dominated day today.  This lunchtime a interdisciplinary team from CMMPH (Centre for Midwifery, Maternal & Perinatal Health) at BU and the University of Exeter submitted a research proposal to the ICM (International Confederation of Midwives) on Midwife-Led Birthing Centres in Low- and Middle-Income  Countries.   As a personal observation: whoever thought that setting the submission deadline for a Sunday was a good idea has no respect for researchers’ work-life balance!

This afternoon many of us attended the  March with Midwives vigils which were held nationwide in the UK to highlight issues with midwifery staffing and working conditions.  The March with Midwives vigil took place in 50 towns and cities, as a vigil to make the general public and politicians aware about the maternity crisis.  In Poole Park it attracted over fifty people.

Prof. Edwin van Teijlingen
CMMPH

Free training sessions for dementia researchers

Bournemouth University is involved in a wider collaboration which organises the Advanced Dementia Research Conference (ADRC 2021).  The conference is delivered online today and tomorrow (19th-20th November).  ADRC 2021 is led by Dr. Brijesh Sathian, BU Visiting Faculty, based in the Geriatric Medicine Department, Rumailah Hospital, in Doha, Qatar.  Saturday morning Prof. Edwin van Teijlingen will be delivering a session on qualitative research, preceded by a session on mixed-methods research from Prof. Padam Simkhada, also BU Visiting Faculty, from the University of Huddersfield.

The programme shown is for Day 2 tomorrow.   All sessions today and tomorrow are free to attend!  You can register here! Please, note that advertised times a Qatar times which three hours ahead of the UK at the moment.  

Prof. Edwin van Teijlingen

CMMPH (Centre for Midwifery, Maternal & Perinatal Health)

 

BU Sonic Arts concert Thursday 18 Nov 5.30pm

 

 

 

 

 

Our first concert of 2021 takes place on Thursday 18th November. You are invited to come and experience the magic of immersive spatial music and sound!

This concert features both multichannel and diffused (spatialised) electroacoustic music by composers from BU – Dr Panos Amelides and Dr Ambrose Seddon.
Venue: Screening Room PG217, Poole Gateway Building, Talbot Campus, Bournemouth University, BH12 5BB

Date/Time: Thursday 18th November 2021 at 5.30pm
Duration: 1 hour (approx)

Admission is free but please register herehttps://www.eventbrite.com/e/207104664627

All events is organised by members of EMERGE, Creative Technology and University Music.

Please share with anyone you feel may be interested. Looking forward to seeing you there!

@BU_Sonic_Arts

Bournemouth research cited in The Sunday Times

Today Bournemouth University’s research on Nepali migrant workers and kidney problems was cited in The Sunday Times. In the preparation for the Qatar 2022 men’s football world cup The Sunday Times published an article under the title ‘Dying for the World Cup‘.

Dr. Pramod Regmi and Dr. Nirmal Aryal were awarded funding from GCRF (The Global Challenges Research Fund) and Bournemouth University’s QR fund.  This work resulted in an editorial highlighting that low-skilled migrant workers in the Middle Wast and Malaysia are at a disproportionately higher risk of kidney problems. The working conditions are often Dirty, Dangerous and Difficult (referred at as the 3Ds) include physically demanding work, exposure to a hot environment, dehydration, chemical exposures, excessive use of pain killers, and lifestyle factors (such as restricted water intake and a high intake of alcohol/sugary drinks) which may precipitate them to acute kidney injuries and subsequent chronic kidney disease [1].  And recently, a national survey of nephrologists (kidney specialists) on their perceptions of the size of the problem of kidney health in Nepali migrant workers [2].

 

 

References:

  1. Aryal, N., Regmi, P.R., Sedhain, A., KC, R.K., Martinez Faller, E., Rijal, A., van Teijlingen, E. (2021). Kidney health risk of migrant workers: An issue we can no longer overlookHealth Prospect 21(1): 15-17.
  2. Aryal, N.Sedhain, A.Regmi, P.KC, R. K., van Teijlingen, E. (2021). Risk of kidney health among returnee Nepali migrant workers: A survey of nephrologists. Asian Journal of Medical Sciences 12(12), 126–132.