Category / Festival of Learning

Latest BU midwifery research newsletter

 

The latest edition of the newsletter of the Centre for Midwifery, Maternal & Perinatal Health has just been published online.  The editor for the latest edition was Dr. Jen Leamon.

The latest newsletter can be found online at:

ttp://research.bournemouth.ac.uk/wp-content/uploads/2013/10/Volume-3-Summer-2014.pdf

Prof. Edwin van Teijlingen

CMMPH

Successful BU Festival of Learning debate of media and fear in childbirth!

Yesterday saw the lively debate organised by Prof. Vanora Hundley on the motion: ‘The media is responsible for creating fear in childbirth.’

 

Elizabeth Duff from the NCT and HSC Prof. Edwin van Teijlingen affiliated with the Centre for Midwifery, Maternal & Perinatal Health and against the motion argued Joanne Dewberry (http://joannedewberry.co.uk/about-joanne/ ), independent blogger, journalist and successful business woman and Dr. Ann Luce from BU’s  Journalism and Communication Academic Group

The debate was part of BU’s Festival of Learning event to explore the role of the mass media in shaping such beliefs and identify whether media portrayals are responsible for rising rates of intervention.  The audience voted in favour of the motion, but the media team managed to get some people to reconsider their views on the impact of the mass media on women’s view of childbirth.

Professors Vanora Hundley and Edwin van Teijlingen

CMMPH

3 more sleeps until the Festival of Learning!

Well Professor Puzzles might be taking a tea break but the rest of in the Festival of Learning team are working our socks off as we get ready to kick off on Monday.  A massive thank you to all the academics and other members of staff involved as well!

We have a few more exciting events for you to have a look through this morning:

 

Get your hands on a PhD at BU

Date: Thursday 12 June

Time: 13.00 – 15.00

Location: Talbot Campus

BU is committed to its postgraduate research students (PGR) and has invested in its Graduate School as a focus for the co-creation of knowledge & doctoral training and providing 100s of funded doctoral studentships since 2006 and going forward to 2018.

Join members of the Graduate School team and our postgraduate researchers to find out about some of the unique and original postgraduate research currently being undertaken at BU and how it impacts our everyday life.  Discover what postgraduate research entails, including the day in the life of a PGR at BU, what opportunities are available and how you can get involved.

Energy scarcity and the role of renewable technologies

Date: Friday 13 June

Time: 18:00 – 20:00

Location: Lansdowne Campus

This event will provide a platform for debating issues of uncertainty in the energy supply market such as recent price hikes, its scarcity, future risks, security and their wider influences on our local and regional socio-economic landscape.

Being an ambassador for Bournemouth

Date: Thursday 12 June

Time: 18:00 – 21:00

Location: Lansdowne Campus

What are you proud of and would want to share about Bournemouth? This participative event will discuss how you can contribute to improving the experience of visitors through becoming an ‘Ambassador for Bournemouth’. Existing Bournemouth Ambassadors who would like to share their experiences are also welcome.

This event is also suitable for host families and Bournemouth residents.

Four writers walk into a pub: An imaginary meeting

Date: Thursday 12 June

Time: 18:00 – 20:00

Location: Talbot Campus

Over the centuries, Dorset has been home to popular writers who, at first glance, had very little in common. This event imagines what might have happened if they had ever all met in a Bournemouth pub.

The spirit of 2014

Date: Thursday 12 June

Time: 18:00 – 19:30

Location: Talbot Campus

Ken Loach’s powerful documentary, The ‘Spirit of ’45′, called for the older generation to talk to teenagers about the post-war welfare legacy, the importance of the NHS, workers’ rights and an equal society. The Spirit of 13 project used short films to make this inter-generational dialogue happen. This workshop will share the outcomes and ask what is the spirit of 2014?

 

Making a Difference with Music

I have to admit I was not having the best of weeks but being part of the BUDI Orchestra’s penultimate rehearsal yesterday was, as one of the participants said to me at the end the session, ‘better than therapy’. 

Some of the highlights for me of this week’s session were a couple celebrating their 59th wedding anniversary by bringing chocolates and biscuits to share with their orchestra friends and telling me this session was the ideal way to celebrate this pretty remarkable period of marriage; another couple who had told me they have been having difficulties communicating reaching out simultaneously for one another’s hands when Moon River was playing; and having people with dementia and their carers tell me that attending this group is the highlight of their week, indeed that they need no persuasion to get out of bed knowing they have their music group to come along to; and to hear that they consider the members of the group their friends. This all demonstrates the true achievement of the BSO musicians, BU students and my team members in rising to the deceptively simple challenge I set for this project: to create an atmosphere that was welcoming, fun, promoted equality between everyone, and where having dementia was not to be the guiding factor, rather for everyone to be part of a ‘normal’ group where people would learn and work together. And they have achieved this in spades!

Seeing for myself the progress and development in those with dementia who have participated over a 9 week period makes this project worthwhile. For example a man, who on week one who was having trouble remembering how to play his double bass (even though he didn’t need much encouragement to teach me some basic notes), now jamming with the professional musicians; how another man, who brought his mouth organ to the first session and began to recall how to play, now plays all the pieces by ear and is smiling from ear to ear after the session ends. Seeing the relaxation and concentration on participants’ faces who had been anxious about first week, but who are completely in the moment and whose verbal communication skills have, to me, taken an absolute upturn, and who now chat easily and at length during the break and at the session end. For example, one participant invited me to their previous home if I was ever passing, it doesn’t matter that they live in Dorset now and were talking about their old address, the important thing is they have increased their sense of social confidence and are reaching out and connecting with others, something that is, all too often, sadly lost by others failing to accommodate the communication needs of those with dementia.

 Have a look yourself at one of the items that will be performed by the BSO and BUDI Orchestra at the Winton life centre on Saturday 14 June, 11am, as part of the BU Festival of Learning programme. I’ve already shown this  to whomever I met yesterday afternoon, and the surprise on colleagues’ faces when they understood that this was a group of people with dementia who had only been rehearsing for 9 weeks and the majority of whom had never played an instrument before was fun to see! Moving from playing, to singing to body percussion in one piece is challenging and demonstrates the development in learning the musicians have enabled over the sessions.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oscti3517ww

 To me, this project is a way to challenge the misconceptions and myths people hold about people with dementia not being able to learn and participate to a high level. I wish I could bottle the benefits that I observed in our participants, and, actually, the benefits that I have gained from being a small part of a truly special group that has created an amazing sense of community with acceptance, fun and friendship at its core.

 The group are already feeling the loss of these sessions as they know they only have one more rehearsal and then the performance and then our FIF funding stops. Yet this is what I would say is true impact: yes, we have the papers and other academic impact values, and we will seek to publish after the sessions end and the follow up period data is collected, but to see the development in how the professional musicians work with those with dementia, most who in the main had not worked with people with dementia before and their absolute engagement and commitment to creating a positive experience for the group; to see how our students have grown in confidence, and the relationships they have built with individuals with dementia is fantastic and demonstrates the impact of learning together. But most of all, to hear about, and see first-hand, the pleasure and benefits for those living with dementia and their carers makes this the best project I’ve ever had the pleasure of being part of, and if anyone has ideas about finding ways to fund this project beyond its research parameters as an on-going community engagement project, please do let me know!

A question of sport, Fear in childbirth, Crime Scene Science, Poison is my business, and a bit of Doctor Who… It can only be the Festival of Learning!

What an exciting line up of events we have this year.  If you haven’t had a good look through at everything that’s on offer this year then pick up a programme around campus (lot’s available in Poole House Reception), or head to the website and have a read of everything that’s going on!  You never know you might find something to inspire your own public engagement efforts for the future!

Here are a selection of hand picked events that we think are definitely worth a look.  Please do share events with friends and family, we’d love to see them here!

A question for sport: The how, why and where of the journey to become an elite sportsperson

Tuesday 10 June

6pm – 7pm, KG03, Kimmeridge House

This fun and interactive session explores what it takes to become an elite sportsperson in Britain. We’ll ask the big questions about why and how the journey is made. You’ll find the answers surprising, emotional and definitely entertaining.

Run by: Andrew Adams

Fear in childbirth: Is the media responsible?

Wednesday 11 June

10am – 12pm, EB206, Executive Business Centre

The media is often blamed for influencing society’s attitudes and views. In this event two teams will debate the impact of the mass media on women’s views of childbirth.

Run by: Vanora Hundley

Crime scene science for teachers

Wednesday 11 June

4pm – 7pm, C139 Crime Lab, Talbot Campus

The workshop is for teachers and laboratory technical staff and will outline methods of examining a crime scene. You’ll learn how to retrieve evidence, as well techniques to enhance evidence, such as fingerprints and blood samples. Everything you learn can be replicated in the school environment and is a practical example of science in action.

Run by: Alex Otto

Poison is my business

Friday 13 June

7pm – 8pm, Executive Business Centre, EB206

David Osselton is one of the country’s most experienced and senior practising forensic toxicologists. This lecture will take you on a trip through the history of poisons, poisoners and the development of modern day forensic toxicology.

Life and death in Doctor Who

Wednesday 11 June

7pm – 8pm, The Barnes Lecture Theatre, Poole House

This event explores why the long-running TV show has been so successful. The session focuses on the series between 2005-2014 and will offer an account of what it is about the hopes and fears, loves and losses that makes the famous Time Lord such a powerful cultural presence.

Run by: Iain MacRury

Festival events – what can we tempt you with today?

Here are a handful of Festival Events you can come along to next week – to find the full list of events head to the website, or look out for programmes around campus. See something that might interest a friend or family member? Spread the word!

As usual, just click on the links to be taken to the website to find out more and book your place

Star Wars planets: Lessons in planetary geology

Saturday 14 June

11am – 12pm, Executive Business Centre (EB306)

Consider yourself a Star Wars fan?  Come along to this fascinating event that teaches you planetary geology for the world of Star Wars:

What would it be like to live on Tatooine with two suns? Or on the ice world of Hoth, or molten Mustafar? This event will focus on a selection of ‘Star Wars’ planets. You’ll explore their geology and learn about our own planet along the way.

Run by Matthew Bennett

Have we made banking good?

Thursday 12 June

12pm – 2pm, Executive Business Centre (EB708)

Since the global financial crisis and ensuing credit crunch, there has been substantial EU and UK sector re-regulation. This panel discussion looks at whether the result is a safer banking system, focused on serving the public good.

Run by Andy Mullineux

Bug grub!

Monday 9 June

11am – 12pm, Poole House (PG73)

A good way to spend an early lunch hour perhaps?  Come along to this event and challenge your dietary perceptions

Supply of conventional protein such as meat and fish is under strain as the world supports a growing population. In order to feed the world we must be open to alternative forms of food – including bugs! Challenge your cultural palate and gastronomic sensibilities by consuming unconventional foods, which are likely to form a large proportion of the food chain in the future.

Run by Andy Boer

What does a forensic scientist really do?

Tuesday 10 June

10am – 4pm, Kimmeridge House (KG03)

One to send on to any teenagers in the family:

This event features a range of illustrated talks and practical exercises for years 10, 11, 12 and 13 students interested in forensic science. It will introduce students to a range of investigative forensic skills using observation, physical and chemical tests.

Run by David Osselton

‘Technophiles’, ‘technophobes’ and ‘technodopers’: Sport & its technology.

Tuesday 10 June

4pm – 5pm, Poole House, (Stevenson Lecture Theatre)

If you missed Bryce’s fantastic talk last year on Prosthetics technology then make sure you don’t miss out again this time!

Be it a ball thrown or a wheelchair raced, this talk highlights the role that technology plays in sport. You’ll learn its colourful history and join the debate on the many controversies that have occurred in sport. We’ll discuss how maximising the performance of technology can be the fine difference between success or failure for an athlete.

Run by Bryce Dyer

 

 

 

 

Data scientist: The sexiest job of the 21st century?

UK Government has identified Data Science as the ‘transforming and growth driving force across all sectors of economy’ and named Big Data as one of the ‘eight great technologies’. With an unprecedented growth in digital content and data, as the digital universe in 2020 is estimated to be 50 times as big as in 2010, we have entered a new era of predictive analytics and data intensive computing. Data scientists are expected to play a key role in this data revolution and their job has even been referred to as “the sexiest job of the 21st century”. This EU INFER sponsored one-day open workshop will combine talks by eminent speakers, a panel-audience discussion, exhibition of projects, hands-on experience session with a number of digital devices and provide a chance to meet data science experts from academia and industry.

Please register at: (http://microsites.bournemouth.ac.uk/festival-of-learning/events/data-scientist-the-sexiest-job-of-the-21st-century/) and join us during this exciting event.

Date: 10 June 2014: 9am – 6pm.

Location: 3rd Floor, Executive Business Centre, 89 Holdenhurst Road, Bournemouth, BH8 8EB

Workshop chair: Prof. Bogdan Gabrys, Data Science Institute, Bournemouth University

Detailed program of the workshop:

9.00 – 9.15 – Welcome and introduction

9.15 – 10.15 – Prof. Nello Cristianini (Bristol University, UK), ThinkBIG : The Impact of Big Data on Science and Society

10.15 – 10.30 – Break

10.30 – 11.30 – Prof. David van Dyk (Imperial College London, UK), Big Data and Complex Modeling Challenges in Astronomy and Solar Physics

11.30 – 14.30 – Lunch combined with networking, exhibitions, poster session and hands on experimenting.

14.30 – 15.45 – Panel discussion: Is Data Science “the transforming and growth driving force across all sectors of economy”? Is a Data Scientist the “sexiest job of the 21st century”? (Panelists to include the keynote speakers and a number of users and experts from academia as well as public and private sectors)

15.45 – 16.00 – Break

16.00 – 17.00 – Prof. Detlef Nauck (BT, UK), Predictive Analytics and Big Data

17.00 – 17.15 – Break

17.15 – 18.00 – Prof. Bogdan Gabrys (Bournemouth University, UK), Data Science at BU

 

Information about invited keynote talks and speakers:

Talk 1: ThinkBIG: The Impact of Big Data on Science and Society by Prof. Nello Cristianini, Professor of Artificial Intelligence, Bristol University

Abstract: Computers can now do things that their programmers cannot explain or understand: today’s Artificial Intelligence has found a way to bypass the need for understanding a phenomenon before we can replicate it in a computer. The technology that made this possible is called machine learning: a method to program computers by showing them examples of the desired behaviour. And the fuel that powers it all is DATA. Lots of it.

For this reason, data has been called the new oil: a new natural resource, that businesses and scientists alike can leverage, by feeding it to massive learning computers to do things that we do not understand well enough to implement them with a traditional program. This new way of working is all about predicting, not explaining. It is about knowing what a new drug will do to a patient, not why. But: was not science meant to help us make sense of the world? Or is it just meant to deliver good predictions? And let us remember that the fuel that powers this revolution is very often our own personal data, and that we still do not have a clear cultural framework to think about this.

Short Bio Note: Nello Cristianini is a Professor of Artificial Intelligence at the University of Bristol. His current research covers the large scale analysis of media content (news and social media), using various AI methods, and the implications of Big Data.

Cristianini is the co-author of two widely known books in machine learning, “An Introduction to Support Vector Machines” and “Kernel Methods for Pattern Analysis” and of a book in bioinformatics “Introduction to Computational Genomics”. He is also a former recipient of the Royal Society Wolfson Research Merit Award and a current holder of a European Research Council Advanced Grant.

Talk 2: Big Data and Complex Modeling Challenges in Astronomy and Solar Physics by Prof. David van Dyk, Professor of Statistics, Imperial College London

Abstract: In recent years, technological advances have dramatically increased the quality and quantity of data available to astronomers.  Newly launched or soon-to-be launched space-based telescopes are tailored to data-collection challenges associated with specific scientific goals. These instruments provide massive new surveys resulting in new catalogs containing terabytes of data, high resolution spectrography and imaging across the electromagnetic spectrum, and incredibly detailed movies of dynamic and explosive processes in the solar atmosphere. These new data streams are helping scientists make impressive strides in our understanding of the physical universe, but at the same time generating massive data-analytic and data-mining challenges for scientists who study the resulting data. This talk will give an overview of a number of statistical challenges that arise form big data and complex models in astronomy and solar physics.

Short Bio Note: David van Dyk is a Professor in the Statistics Section of the Department of Mathematics at Imperial College London. After obtaining his PhD from the University of Chicago, he held faculty positions at Harvard University and the University of California, Irvine before relocating to London in 2011. Professor van Dyk was elected Fellow in the American Statistical Association in 2006, elected Fellow of the Institute of Mathematical Statistics in 2010, received a Wolfson Merit Award in 2011, and was elected to the Board of Directors of the American Statistical Association (2015-17). His scholarly work focuses on methodological and computational issues involved with Bayesian analysis of highly structured statistical models and emphasizes serious interdisciplinary research, especially in astronomy. He founded and coordinates the CHASC International Astrostatistics Center and is particularly interested in improving the efficiency of computationally intensive methods involving data augmentation, such as EM-type algorithms and various Markov chain Monte Carlo methods.

Talk 3: Predictive Analytics and Big Data by Prof Dr Detlef Nauck, Chief Research Scientist, BT

Abstract: Detlef’s research focuses on exploiting large operational data sources to improve BT’s systems, networks and processes. The ultimate goal is the introduction of autonomic systems into operations that can learn from historic data to self- improve, self-configure and self-heal. In his presentation, Detlef will discuss how the application of predictive analytics to operational data has led to a number of solutions in BT’s operations that predict performance of networks, systems and processes, and forecast expected demand. Detlef will also discuss some current research topics at BT, which range from automatic discovery of patterns, to autonomic behaviour in processes and systems, to the challenges of exploiting Big Data.

Short Bio Note: Detlef Nauck is a Chief Research Scientist with BT’s Research and Innovation Division located at Adastral Park, Ipswich, UK. He is leading a group of international scientists working on Intelligent Data Analysis and Autonomic Systems. He is a Visiting Professor at Bournemouth University and a Private Docent at the Otto-von-Guericke University of Magdeburg, Germany. Detlef holds an MSc (1990) and a PhD (1994) in Computer Science both from the University of Braunschweig, Germany. He also holds a Habilitation (post-doctoral degree) in Computer Science from the Otto-von-Guericke University of Magdeburg, Germany (2000). Detlef has published over 120 papers, holds 4 patents and 20 active patent applications.

Bigger on the Inside

 

 

 

 

 

The Doctor, his TARDIS-driven adventures, along with companions and iconic monsters, are all over the TV and newspapers. The Inner World of Doctor Who is a new book, just out. Written by Prof Mike Rustin (UEL, Tavsitock Clinic) and Prof. Iain MacRury in the Media School here at BU. This publication offers an accessible account of Doctor Who. It focusses just on the most recent television output – 2005 to 2013 – and examines why the show continues to fascinate us.
The Doctor’s relationships with his companions are to the fore. Various chapters also consider the dramatic meanings of monsters and time travel – linking the show back to ideas about audience experience – and what we might ‘learn’ from Doctor Who. It looks at the complexity of the new Doctor Who in its depictions of the suffering of the Doctor, as well that of his at times vulnerable and dependent companions. A connection is made between TV content and some (but not all) elements in the experience of psychotherapy.
We propose that one way of thinking about the Doctor is to see him as a kind of inadvertent ‘therapist’ – with the TV dramas on screen rendering troubled states of mind and society within a rich cultural frame. Doctor Who extends a fairy-tale and children’s fictional tradition across its contemporary media platforms. As we argue: In Doctor Who everyday life is often revealed to be “Bigger on the inside.”

The 50th anniversary won’t come again and it provided a chastening deadline we’re glad to have met it! The book was inspired by the startling success of the show in recent years. Why does it attract such attention and affection? While thinking about it I  got further daily encouragement from the TARDIS that sits on the ground floor of Weymouth House, courtesy of our former Media School colleague, Dr Andrew Ireland.

The Inner World of Doctor Who is published with Karnac books. It should be of interest to diehard fans. But it is written, too, for people who probably wouldn’t claim the title ‘fan’ but for whom all the fuss about Time Lords and Tardises just now (The Doctor is even on postage stamps!) is provoking the thought: “What’s this all about!?” The Inner World of Doctor Who offers some answers.
 – Written with a colleague, Prof. Mike Rustin, from UEL and the Tavistock and Portman NHS Trust the book emerges from an enriching collaboration that began in some teaching sessions at the Tavistock clinic on their MA in Psychoanalytic Studies. It has now developed into this book. The book came together quite quickly and has been usefully supported by an AHRC funded network called “Media and the Inner World”. The book is published as part of their new series with Karnac called Psychoanalysis and Popular Culture.
If you are interested the book can be found at http://www.karnacbooks.com/Product.asp?PID=34857 or as an e-book: http://www.amazon.co.uk/Inner-World-Doctor-Psychoanalytic-Psychoanalysis/dp/1782200835