Category / Impact

Grant of international patent for invention at BU

It comes as a great news for both BU and academic staff that a major international patent has been granted by China National Intellectual Property Administration who have confirmed that it will record the grant of the patent right in the Patent Register, issue the patent certificate for invention, and announce the grant. The patent right shall take effect from the date of announcement, July 4, 2023.

This is a predictive and prognostic invention as a remote probing system to monitor corrosion of conductive or nonconductive coatings and subsurface degradation.

The EIS measurement is resistant to interference and has a high corrosion resolution which produces stable and reliable results. Protective properties of a coating can be learned from an impedance spectroscopy obtained via the measurement that reflects changes in the coating and at the interface of coating-substrate system.

Project lead Professor Zulfiqar Khan has congratulated their co-inventors Dr Mian Hammad Nazir and Dr Adil Saeed for their hard work, dedication and passion over the years. This is the result of years of collective work spanning over several research programmes, Professor Khan added.

This invention will enable, a diverse portfolio of industry sectors and applications in aerospace, automotive industry, shipyards, petrochemical, process, infrastructures, high value assets including Reinforced Concrete (RC) elements of marine structures such as piled jetties, marine installation, gas pipelines, motorways structures and mobile assets such as large vehicles, to monitor, predict and prognose a complex failure initiation and propagation mechanism in real time. This will result in significant cost savings, reducing downtime, enhancing reliability and service life.

Further details and media coverage with a short video about the background of work is available here.

Keywords: Condition monitoring, corrosion, coating, sensor, impedance, electrochemical, spectroscopy, materials, composites.

Filming day for the DEALTS2 instructional video for dementia trainers

Try to imagine living with dementia. Now consider how it might feel caring for a person with dementia. Both concepts are challenging to imagine. However, understanding such concepts is key to improving the delivery of care.  

On 27th June 2023, the cameras were rolling live on Lansdowne Campus at Bournemouth University. Dr Michelle Heward and Director Jon Nichols (Jon Nichols Video Production) were filming a train-the-trainer video designed to support those wishing to use the Dementia Education and Learning Through Simulation 2 (DEALTS2) toolkit confidentially in their own training. The DEALTS2 programme, commissioned by Health Education England, is a training package that uses simulation-based activities to place staff into the shoes of a person with dementia. 

Social care providers including Managers, Support Workers, and Developmental Leads who deliver dementia training to staff in their care homes, day centres, and home care services across Dorset came in to receive training and were filmed for the video. There was a fantastic buzz as everyone arrived welcoming the opportunity to “refresh their dementia knowledge” and were excited to “gain new ideas to deliver dementia training”.  

Delivered wonderfully by Dr Michelle Heward, the training was enjoyed by all especially during the simulation activities. These scenario activities included cost-effective and fun tasks such as making origami swans with varying levels of challenging instructions, some deliberately frustrating! Designed to stimulate understanding of living with dementia to inform the care provided, the tasks were considered as “helpful”, “informative”, and “thought provoking and relevant to their service and carers”.  

After a reinvigorating day filming, care providers were “excited to go away and use the DEALTS2 training” and felt “confident” in delivery of the “excellent” resources. It was fantastic to hear most organisations are hoping to use the DEALTS2 resources within their own organisations in the next few months.  

Thanks to everyone who came along, agreed to be filmed, and helped produce the train-the-trainer video. Everyone did an amazing job and appeared unfazed by the camera during the demands of film production. Thanks also to Harry the boom operator and local actors Alex, Samuel, Rae, Amelia, and Nora who supported the day. The DEALTS2 train-the-trainer video was only possible with all your help. Currently in the editing process, watch this space to see how everyone got on!

For more information or to access the DEALTS2 training programme please visit: https://www.hee.nhs.uk/our-work/dementia-awareness/dementia-education-learning-through-simulation-2  

Lyndsey Bradley, BSc final year undergraduate
Research Assistant
Faculty of Health and Social Sciences 

REF 2028: what we know so far…

The UK’s higher education funding bodies have published details of proposed changes to the Research Excellence Framework (REF) for 2028.

They state that they are seeking to change the emphasis of the national assessment from the performance of individuals to the contributions of institutions and disciplines to a healthy and inclusive research environment.

Some of the proposed changes include:

  • Research outputs will contribute to 50 per cent of a Unit of Assessment (UoA), down from 60 per cent in REF 2021. This element has been renamed to ‘contribution to knowledge and understanding’ and, while assessment will continue to largely be based on assessment of submitted outputs, at least 10% of the score will be based on evidence of broader contributions to the advancement of the discipline.
  • ‘People and Culture’ will replace the environment element of REF 2021 and will be assessed at both a disciplinary and institutional level. This element will make up 25 per cent of the overall score, up from 15 per cent in REF 2021, and will be expanded to include an assessment of research culture.
  • An ‘engagement and impact’ element, weighted at 25 per cent, will replace the impact element of REF 2021. Submissions will consist of both impact case studies and an accompanying statement to evidence engagement and activity beyond case studies.
  • The work of all researchers and research-enabling staff will be eligible for submission to REF 2028. Research volume will be determined from average staff volumes over multiple years and there will not be any minimum or maximum contributions of any individuals.

The changes come as part of the Future Research Assessment Programme (FRAP), which has reviewed how national research assessment is carried out in the UK.

Professor Dame Jessica Corner, Executive Chair at Research England, said:

“This is a once-in-a-generation moment for change as we shift national research assessment away from a focus on individuals to how institutions and disciplines contribute to healthy, dynamic and inclusive research environments, and as we shift from a focus on published research outputs towards a broader view of what constitutes research excellence and how it can be demonstrated.”

The sector will now have the opportunity to input into further development of REF 2028, with consultation running until October 2023.

Find out more on the UKRI website

BU and University of Cambridge Collaboration on Traffic Prediction

Bournemouth University (BU) has collaborated with the University of Cambridge on network wide road traffic prediction. The work, led by Dr. Wei Koong Chai in BU, address the problem of traffic prediction on large-scale road networks and propose a novel deep learning model, Virtual Dynamic Graph Convolution Neural Network and Transformer with Gate and Attention mechanisms (VDGCNeT), to comprehensively extract complex, dynamic and hidden spatial dependencies of road networks for achieving high prediction accuracy. The work advocates the use of a virtual dynamic road graph that captures the dynamic and hidden spatial dependencies of road segments in real road networks instead of purely relying on the physical road connectivity.

The team designed a novel framework based on Graph Convolution Neural Network (GCN) and Transformer to analyse dynamic and hidden spatial–temporal features. The gate mechanism is utilised for concatenating learned spatial and temporal features from Spatial and Temporal Transformers, respectively, while the Attention-based Similarity is used to update dynamic road graph.

Two real-world traffic datasets from large-scale road networks with different properties are used for training and testing the model. VDGCNeT is pitted against nine other well-known models in the literature. The results demonstrate that the proposed VDGCNeT is capable of achieving highly accurate predictions – on average 96.77% and 91.68% accuracy on PEMS-BAY and METR-LA datasets respectively. Overall, our VDGCNeT performs the best when compared against other existing models.

Reference:

G. Zheng, W. K. Chai, J. Zhang and V. Katos, “VDGCNeT: A novel network-wide Virtual Dynamic Graph Convolution Neural network and Transformer-based traffic prediction model,” Knowledge-based Systems, 110676, June 2023. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.knosys.2023.110676.

Anatomy of an impact case study online workshop – 7th June

If you’re hoping to write an impact case study in the future, or developing one for the next REF, or you would just like to know more about REF impact case studies, this session is for you.

This two-hour workshop will:

  • look in detail at the different sections and what is required for each one
  • examine impact case studies from REF2021 to establish what the panels are looking for
  • help you think about what you need to do to start building your own impact case study

By the end of the session you will be familiar with the structure of an impact case study, understand what makes an excellent one and what you need to start building an impact case study from your own research.

Please note this session is now taking place online via MS Teams.

Book your place here

 

 

Anatomy of an impact case study workshop – 7th June

If you would like to know more about REF impact case studies, are hoping to write a case study in the future, or are working towards a case study for the next REF, then this session is for you.

A two-hour, in-person workshop examining in detail everything impact case study, we will look at the different sections and what is required for each one, then examine impact case studies from previous REFs to establish what the panels are looking for. We will then move on to thinking about what you would need to do to start building your own impact case study.

By the end of this session you will be familiar with the structure of an impact case study, what makes an excellent case study and what you will need in order to start building an impact case study from your own research.

Book via OD here