Category / Knowledge Exchange and Impact Team

New study published comparing high-scoring and low-scoring impact case studies from REF2014

A paper titled: Writing impact case studies: a comparative study of high-scoring and low-scoring case studies from REF2014 was published in Nature this week.

The authors have analysed the content and language of the impact case studies submitted to REF2014 and concluded that: “implicit rules linked to written style may have contributed to scores alongside the published criteria on the significance, reach and attribution of impact”. The article is enlightening, with many useful tables comparing high and low-scoring impact case studies which show a clear difference in content and language between them.

From the abstract: “The paper provides the first empirical evidence across disciplinary main panels of statistically significant linguistic differences between high- versus low-scoring case studies, suggesting that implicit rules linked to written style may have contributed to scores alongside the published criteria on the significance, reach and attribution of impact. High-scoring case studies were more likely to provide specific and high-magnitude articulations of significance and reach than low-scoring cases. High-scoring case studies contained attributional phrases which were more likely to attribute research and/or pathways to impact, and they were written more coherently (containing more explicit causal connections between ideas and more logical connectives) than low-scoring cases. High-scoring case studies appear to have conformed to a distinctive new genre of writing, which was clear and direct, and often simplified in its representation of causality between research and impact, and less likely to contain expressions of uncertainty than typically associated with academic writing.”

The authors analyse each section of impact case studies and find differences in language and content in the research, impact and evidence sections of high and low scoring case studies. As they say: “The findings of our work enable impact case study authors to better understand the genre and make content and language choices that communicate their impact as effectively as possible”.

Deadline approaching for the Research Impact Fund 2019/20

The deadline for the Research Impact Fund is 5pm on Thursday 12 December.  Applications must be submitted to researchimpact@bournemouth.ac.uk. To apply, please read the policy, and guidance.

If you wish to discuss your application in more detail, please come along to one of our lunchtime drop-in surgeries this week.  Panel members will be on hand to answer any queries.

Tuesday 10 December Talbot Campus – F304 12:30 – 13:30
Wednesday 11 December Lansdowne Campus – EB603 12:00 – 13:00

If you can’t make any of the drop-in surgeries but you’d still like to talk to someone about your application, please email Genna del Rosa (Panel Secretary) or contact your Faculty Impact Officer:

Research Impact Fund: drop-in surgeries to support your application

The deadline for the research impact fund is fast approaching, on Thursday 12 December. Join our panel members at the last few drop-in lunch time surgeries to discuss your ideas.

If you’re not sure which strand to apply for, or you have any queries about the guidance or application form, then come along and let us help you.

Monday 2 December Lansdowne Campus – EB303 12:30 – 13:30
Thursday 5 December Talbot Campus – F206 12:30 – 13:30
Tuesday 10 December Talbot Campus – F304 12:30 – 13:30
Wednesday 11 December Lansdowne Campus – EB603 12:00 – 13:00

 

Applications must be submitted to researchimpact@bournemouth.ac.uk by 5pm on Thursday 12 December. To apply, please read the policy, application form and guidance.

If you can’t make any of the drop-in surgeries but you’d still like to talk to someone about your application, please email Genna del Rosa (Panel Secretary) or contact your Faculty Impact Officer:

How to turn your Research into Impact

Amanda Lazar and Brian McNulty are running an Impact Planning Session on Friday 6th December for anyone engaged in research – from ECRs to Professors.

If you have some research that you think has the potential to make a positive change in the world, then bring it along.

We will discuss how to effectively disseminate your research,  plan your impact pathway and how to evidence the impact of your research, as well as how to work towards an Impact Case Study for the REF.

By the end of the session you will have the outline of an impact pathway and will know how to access BU resources to help turn your research into impact.

Click here to book yourself onto the workshop.

Research Impact Fund: drop-in surgeries to support your application

Do you have an idea for your research impact funding application?  Or perhaps you’re not sure which strand to apply for? Or are you confused by the guidance? Join us at our lunchtime drop-in surgeries to discuss your ideas and ask any questions to members of our funding panel.

Thursday 21 November Talbot Campus – P402 12:30 – 13:30
Monday 25 November Talbot Campus – P411 12:00 – 13:00
Wednesday 27 November Lansdowne Campus – B202 12:00 – 13:00
Monday 2 December Lansdowne Campus – EB303 12:30 – 13:30
Thursday 5 December Talbot Campus – F206 12:30 – 13:30
Tuesday 10 December Talbot Campus – F304 12:30 – 13:30
Wednesday 11 December Lansdowne Campus – EB603 12:00 – 13:00

Applications must be submitted to researchimpact@bournemouth.ac.uk by 5pm on Thursday 12 December. To apply, please read the policy, application form and guidance.

If you can’t make any of the drop-in surgeries but you’d still like to talk to someone about your application, please email Genna del Rosa (Panel Secretary) or contact your Faculty Impact Officer:

Ways of Seeing Sport Coaching Violence – a unique interactive installation

On Monday 4th November 2019, as part of the ESRC festival of social science, Dr Emma Kavanagh and Dr Adi Adams (Faculty of Management) alongside final year sport student Terri Harvey, curated and hosted an arts based installation to showcase their research on inter-personal violence in sport. The event adopted an innovative, immersive, sensory art-based method not traditionally utilised in sport coach education (but widely used in other ‘caring’ professions) to bring their research knowledge to life and allow coaches and other practitioners to engage with data in a dynamic manner. This was achieved through re-presenting research data collected by the BU academics in audio and visual forms.

Abuse, intimidation and violence in sport and coaching remains a significant global problem. In 2017 the British Government published the Duty of Care in Sport Review, sharing the findings of a critical inquiry into the culture and climate of elite sport in the United Kingdom. High performance sport came under significant scrutiny linked to a number of high profile accounts in the media that raised serious questions concerning the safety of elite sporting spaces and the threats they can pose to athlete welfare. Allegations of bullying, racial, sexual and gender abuse alongside other forms of discrimination have been made across Olympic and Paralympic sports. This ESRC event provided an opportunity to engage practitioners in debates surrounding the safety of sporting spaces as a way of promoting the duty of care in practice.

The event brought to life qualitative social science research data, currently available to academics through peer-reviewed journal articles through the production of an immersive arts-based installation. The data was used to enable those who attended to see/hear/feel and confront the contemporary issue of inter-personal violence in the world of sport coaching, from the perspective of ‘others’. The event aimed to bring sport coaches (and other practitioners) together around a shared concern/problem in the sport industry, with the aim of inspiring awareness, understanding, empathy, care and practical solutions to reducing interpersonal-violence. An arts and media-based approach is often adopted in the education of other ‘caring’ professions engaged in complex, difficult, ‘social’ and emotional work (e.g. nurses, medical practitioners, social workers, palliative care workers), yet has gained limited application in the sporting profession.

 

The event attracted significant attention from external practitioners, students and local organisations. Participants moved around and shared the immersive space with others, experiencing the ‘felt difficulty’ (Trevelyan et al., 2014) of ‘what it feels like’ to experience violence and intimidation as a participant in sport. It is anticipated that experiencing this ‘felt difficulty’, provoked by engaging with material that is ‘perplexing’ or ‘disorientating’ has the potential to provide a platform for coaches to reflect authentically on and transform their own practice. The impact of attending the installation is currently the topic of Terri’s dissertation and the team are excited to understand more about how participants experienced the event.

The event would not have been a success without the support of the ESRC team and, in particular, Adam Morris who helped drive the installation forward. In addition, thanks goes to the sport students who volunteered on the evening and actively engaged in the project through ‘becoming voices’. All of these people shared one passion; making sport a safer space for all those who participate in it.